Integrated Expertise Research

 

Systems in the 21st century

 

What’s happening in IT?

 

Your enterprise systems are now in their second, third or fourth generation of business systems.  Almost all the software is online or outsourced. It is owned by a handful of different international suppliers.  There is a chief information officer who deals with contracts and deploys contract business analysts whenever new systems are required.

 

Who really knows what is going on? Who can tell you the capability of your systems?

 

Why should anyone care?

 

The answer is simple: the value of enterprise systems and the expertise in an organisation lies in their integration.  

 

All most all large-scale administrative enterprise level systems are "legacy" system even if purchased yesterday as they embody practices and code and data-structures that have developed over decades. Enterprises on the 3rd or fourth generations of enterprise information have moulded their processes to some-one else’s “industry’s best practice.”  These systems are frequently outsourced with enterprise users doing thing the way the computer dictates. Inevitably the people who understand the information systems are the vendors experts, typically specialists, while very few understand what the integrated system does. It is integration that gives value to data and logic. In is the integration of expertise of specialists systems integrate to give value to enterprises.

 

 

    

A patchwork of systems or the Integration of knowledge

 

However we wish to talk about information systems at the centre of all conversations lies the structure of the system itself; the sprawling invisible system of logic with connections to other systems that only specialists, perhaps long departed, know about.  These systems overlap to form the new invisible patchwork of logics that is the sociological marker of modern information rich society.  All understanding brings commercial opportunities.  Understanding what makes society work turns understanding into commercial vision.

 

For an enterprise, whether commercial or governmental, managers need to know what the capability of their enterprise's systems and what data can be incorporated that tells them about their commercial and legal environment.

 

 

 

 

The two are connected.  What do we need to know about the hidden structures in systems that make the economics in the data more visible and how do we integrate those structures in our systems.  This is the realm of "big data." But an ad-hoc approach clutters the information "volume" with relations, relations of relations, relations of relations of .... ". 

 

Organisations and enterprise can be left with systems that made connections at the time they were set up. That might have been decades ago and those connections haves faded as consumer fashions, legal environments and demography changed. The systems are cluttered with subsystems that, even if documented, remain mysterious.  It is one thing to understand data coming from outside the organisation; it is another thing to understand how the information motor of the organisation defines how the organisation or enterprise interacts with the world.

 

 

All most all large-scale administrative enterprise level systems are "legacy" system even if purchased yesterday as they embody practices and code and data-structures that have developed over decades.  Enterprises on the 3rd or fourth EIS are generally not writing their own. They are frequently outsourced with enterprise users doing thing the way the computer dictates. Inevitably the people who understand the information systems are the vendors experts, typically specialists, while very few understand what the integrated system does. It is integration that gives value to data and logic. In is the integration of expertise of specialists systems integrate to give value to enterprises.

 

Integrated Expertise Research is about understanding these themes. Bringing together the themes of “big data” and “big logic” with 50 years of business systems analysis and development, the aim of the research is to go beyond “IT” and develop new ideas for knowing our systems (however implemented) and knowing their capability to turn data into commercial opportunity.